BLOOMINGTON — New DNA test results shake up the list of possible suspects in the 1993 Jennifer Lockmiller case — and strengthens Alan Beaman’s claim of innocence.

Recently tested evidence contained no DNA from Beaman, who spent more than a dozen years in prison before a court ordered him released, or from three other men considered suspects in the case. It did, however, contain DNA from two unknown males.

Documents submitted Thursday to the Illinois Prisoner Review Board by Beaman’s lawyers contained the results of tests a Missouri lab did on a vaginal swab taken from Lockmiller.

Beaman, now 39, was released in 2008 following the reversal of his murder conviction by the Illinois Supreme Court in an opinion that called the evidence in his 1995 jury trial “tenuous.”

McLean County prosecutors opted to dismiss the murder charges against Beaman but have maintained that authorities consider Lockmiller’s death an open case. Beaman and Lockmiller had a rocky dating relationship that had ended shortly before she was found strangled and stabbed in her Normal apartment.

Assistant State’s Attorney Pablo Eves said Thursday his office has received the results, which are being reviewed.

The significance of the new evidence cannot be overstated, said Beaman lawyers Karen Daniel and Jeff Urdangen in their supplemental report to the clemency board considering recommending a pardon to Gov. Pat Quinn.

Crime scene evidence indicating that Lockmiller had been sexually assaulted combined with the DNA report “very strongly suggests that at least one, if not both, of the contributors of the semen raped and killed her,” said the lawyers.

The DNA report also “demonstrates that the prosecution’s theory of the case at Alan Beaman’s trial was utterly false,” said the lawyers with the Center on Wrongful Convictions in Chicago.

The recent round of DNA testing was completed as part of a certificate of innocence petition filed by Beaman in 2009. The McLean County state’s attorney’s office has opposed the certificate, which, if granted, would qualify Beaman to receive $170,000 from the state as compensation for the 13 years he served of a 50-year sentence.

In March 2011, the state asked for permission to have additional tests performed on the material recovered from the 22-year-old victim’s body.

The recent testing follows forensic examinations in 2003 on the same evidence, tests that did not yield definitive answers. With advances in technology comes the possibility that a new round of testing could produce useful results, prosecutors claimed.

Four of the Illinois State University student’s former boyfriends were considered suspects by police in the initial investigation. In addition to Beaman, police also questioned Michael Swain, who was Beaman’s former roommate and had recently lived with Lockmiller, Stacey Gates, and a fourth man referred to as John Doe by authorities. John Doe also had supplied the victim with drugs, according to police.

The Missouri lab had access to the DNA of all four men, according to documents.

In many appeals filed since the conviction, Beaman’s lawyers have argued that jurors should have been told about the existence of John Doe as a viable suspect. A judge barred information about the man, who did not have an alibi for the time Lockmiller was killed.

Beaman grew up in Rockford with his family before he entered Illinois Wesleyan University in 1990. Before his arrest on murder charges, the criminal history for the theatre arts major consisted of a speeding ticket he received a year after Lockmiller’s death. Beaman moved back to Rockford after his graduation in 1994 and was working as a meat wrapper at a grocery store when his former girlfriend was killed.

Beaman and his wife live in Rockford and are expecting their first child next month.

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(22) comments

LIVIN_LOUIE
LIVIN_LOUIE

Who is surprised by this? I'm not. Wrongful convictions have become business as usual in Illinois. Law enforcement picks out its target, prosecutors push it through grand jury, and after a quick trial, the jury of insurance adjusters and farmers rubber stamp it. Nevermind that people are spending their lives locked up for crimes they didn't commit. As long as everyone feels good that someone is going to pay. Disgusting.

Ted Simmons
Ted Simmons

I'm confused; why is former Chief Crutcher quoted here? He wasn't Chief at the time of this incident was he? Once again the Daily Paragraph not having a clue...

not-so-political
not-so-political

It has always been in this county that if you are taken to court you have to proof innocents not them having to proof guilt. With older people on juries they always think the cops and SA never do anything wrong. The BPD and its good ol boy days are gone. Now it is just a bunch of young people trying to make a name for themselfs. A good person wanting to be a cop would move from this area and fined a professional dept to work for.

rasbritz
rasbritz

and with the prisons overcrowded...The people we elect are not so smart maybe we should stat looking at someone with no college education or high school diploma..I mean for pete sakes this is crazy

goneriding
goneriding

livin-louie you are so right on with that.Well i think all the people in this case of wrong doing are going to be in the spot light so we and see them for what they are.It's time we see and here the truth for the two family's that had there life turn'ed upside down.There is some people that are not sleeping tonight and they need to pray alot

plainjane777
plainjane777

Wow. Imagine. He's only been asking for testing since 2000. How many tax dollars were spent on the state fighting it and his incarceration? YES Alan and fam! Vindication - it's about time! http://www.rrstar.com/news/x1191426665/DNA-tests-sought-in-95-conviction

wkendguy
wkendguy

There should be consequences at the States Atorney level for wrongful prosecution of any one. The evidence in the case certainly made it unlikely that Alan Beaman commited tis murder. Why should tax payers have to fork over tax dollars for the wrongful prosecution and conviction of any person. I'm sure we'll never hear an apology from those responsible. Their lives continued happily, big salaries, nice homes, good times, while they ruined other peoples iives. They should face criminal charges with big consequence, jail time, hugh fines, just the same as any criminal who commits a criminal act.

vox populi
vox populi

John Doe?? Why is this person not named like the others? Special treatment?? I would think someone supplying drugs would be a huge suspect. I'd like to know who "John Doe" is and why his identity was kept under wraps.

BC
BC

Because you, and the rest of the nosey public, don't need to know who John Doe is. It serves no purpose pertaining to the case. The public has a right to know news that effects the public in general. The public doesn't have a right to know things just to satisfy their curiosity. This isn't a TV drama it is life and no details about any case should be made public before any trial. That's one of the reasons this fellow spent all those years in jail.

vox populi
vox populi

If someone is getting favorable treatment because of who he is and not what he has done then the system is broken. I don't care what John Doe's name is but if the prosecution is protecting someone because they have political ties or influence then that is wrong. (It has happened before) I'm not nosey, I want justice for whomever deserves it.

rasbritz
rasbritz

It's the public's right to know..This system only seems to hide things directly related to the department,government or family..Aren't you a little worried about our system?

not-so-political
not-so-political

$170,000.00 ? It should be more like 500,000.00 for wages missed than million for wrongful prosecution and imprisonment. I would think the police department the SA's office and the judge would be targeted for large law suits. This man will never get his 13 years back nor will he be able to forget the 13 years he spent in prison. Bloomington and McLean County get out your check books you owe this man and should have to pay. PD should do better police work and the SA should not go to trail if they not not have full proof of guilt.

calvin
calvin

This was an NPD case, so I'm not sure why you think Blm would be involved.

bertee
bertee

I would say a absolute minimum of $100K per year tax free = $1.3 million in this case. I doubt anyone here on this blog would give up 13 years of their life in prison for that. I know I wouldn't. Further any and all proven to be complacent in illegal proceedings to convict this man should serve a mandatory prison term as well.

rasbritz
rasbritz

Nobody should get convicted if the proof isn't there either...I don't think this jury is so innocent myself

Captain America
Captain America

To BC: How can not knowing John Doe's identity NOT affect the public in general?? Seriously?? If John Doe is the person who raped, strangled, and killed this girl, and he is still out there, I think that that affects the public in general in a VERY large way! We the public in general NEED to know the identity when the public officials figure it out.

rasbritz
rasbritz

Ya kinda makes you wonder who this person is and why they call him john doe yet all the other names are published...Must be some big shots son..Maybe this plot get thicker?

orosco
orosco

Doesn't this just show that she had sex with two other people? If they know for a fact she was raped at the time of the murder, than it shows a lot more, but I don't recall if that was the case or not.

I'm not saying the case shouldn't have been thrown out, but its easy to overreact to DNA evidence. Defense attorneys often try to sell DNA found on a victim as "exoneration" but all it shows is contact with other people.

orosco
orosco

It's also interesting that none of the other suspects' DNA was found there, which of course makes the defense theory of the case "utterly false" as well (assuming that the murderer(s) raped her) The fact that the information about those suspects wasn't turned over, or presented the jury, was the reason the case got overturned, and that was a red herring all along, apparently.

Hopefully the origin of the the DNA can be found. Certainly it's at least suspicious that they never came forward. Of course, it's possible they didn't know who she was.

rasbritz
rasbritz

I think this guy deserves millions after everything Mclean county prosecutors put him thru...My god half his life wasted because they want to keep their conviction rate up....How many more are there out there..I think everyone involved needs to lose their license to practice law..Why were these test not done before trial? He can never get those years back and 170000 is nothing to repay him for their misconduct

Comment deleted.
rasbritz
rasbritz

I will tell you what i think? The crooks keep getting elected cause only the crooks seem to be voting or only their votes count...The others get thrown away

Michelle23
Michelle23

I pray the real killer is brought to justice. Congrats, Alan on your marriage and baby soon on the way :D

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