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Pi, as you might recall from math class, is the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter and is commonly known as 3.14159, a number non-mathematicians use so often that I had to look it up to type it.

Not some people, though.

Like John Trefzger, a well-known retired minister from Bloomington’s First Christian Church.

Think of Rev. John on Pi Day, an annual "event" celebrated each year, on March 14 (3.14). This year, it will have added significance because the date will be 3-14-15. In fact, at 53 seconds after 9:26 a.m., it will even 3.141592653. That is pi to the ninth degree.

John knows that.

In his grade school days in Peoria, he says, he became fascinated by pi's infinite, non-repetitive number of digits after its decimal point. Trefzger each year has, just for fun, memorized the next digit of pi. He continued that until about age 85.

John is now 91. The good news is, pi today has been calculated to more than one trillion digits, so John still has a few billion or more years to go before he runs out of pi.

That’s John pictured here, modeling his forthcoming "holiday" sweatshirt. He even has a table in his home, specially sculpted in the shape of pi.

Police beat: We'd hesitate to suggest that movies alter our actions or provide ideas, but there was a police-radio report the other afternoon of officers being called to a Twin City area home to rescue a person who “can’t get out of the handcuffs” that had been "jokingly" placed on the hands of the "victim" by a private citizen, not a law enforcement officer.

No word if the residents had seen “Fifty Shades of Grey.”

Pontiac famous … again!: When it comes to wayward notoriety, Pontiac, Ill., would surely rank as one of America’s most subtly famous.

Last year, the town celebrated the 30th anniversary of Jamie Lee Curtis and Patrick Swayze being there for a summer as they filmed the movie “Grandview USA.”

A much-hyped episode of NBC’s “Revolution” took place there.

On the WB Network is “Supernatural,” where one of the series’ lead families lives in – yes — Pontiac, Ill.

Now there’s this.

Flip open Sports Illustrated magazine this month, in its annual and internationally popular Swimsuit Edition, and there is a series of swim-suited models along “America’s highway” — Route 66. And it's Pontiac!

Its famed Route 66 mural, behind the Route 66 Hall of Fame, is in one shot and another shows the Bob Waldmire mural on Main Street as a backdrop. If you don’t get the magazine, you can access a 4-minute video at www.si.com/route66.

That suggestion comes with this warning: The models have beautiful hair on their heads. We bring that up because, as can be the case in the swimsuit issue, a model’s upper head occasionally can be her most covered body part.

Ah, the gasoline game in B-N: Gas is as cheap in Bloomington as in Normal.

You’ve probably noticed that.

What is odd, though, is that Bloomington has a 4-cent gas tax it adds to every gallon … but Normal does not. Yet.

Shouldn’t gas then be four cents cheaper in Normal?

Yet, a check of GasBuddy this week showed that of the 17 cheapest places to buy gas in B-N, all but one of those was in Bloomington, not Normal.

Does that make any sense? Or … is that "cents"?

At the Oscars: If you watched last Sunday's Oscar telecast (Doogie Howser in his underwear, remember?), you probably also heard about those various "swag bags" handed to all the celebs.

What you might not have heard: Included in one set of the bags was a candle from the Sugar Mint Candle Co., a Montgomery, Ill.-based company largely of one (Jennie Hamlin Gatske) who makes the candles in her home.

Four days before the Oscars, Jennie got the call of a lifetime: an organization putting together the bags had seen Jennie's work and wanted some for the bags.

So, by that nightfall, Jennie was furiously shipping 75 candles and 175 vouchers (all she had available) to Los Angeles and, by Monday morning, Jennie's candles were even mentioned in a Huffington Post story on the contents of those now-famous bags.

One other thing: Jennie is a 1989 graduate of Bloomington High School. As Jennie puts it: "Not bad for a little home-based soy candle business ..."

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