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BLOOMINGTON — The sky was sunny Friday, but the effects of Thursday's snowfall the first big accumulation of the season were still felt on area roads and in classrooms and emergency rooms.

The heavy snowfall Thursday afternoon and evening left 4 to 5 inches covering the Twin Cities and Lincoln, while Pontiac received 6 inches. More snow is possible this weekend.

While schools in Bloomington-Normal were open Friday, several rural districts, including Downs-based Tri-Valley, Delavan and Stanford-based Olympia, closed for the day because of drifting snow.

Conditions on rural roads ranged from clear to icy and hazardous across Central Illinois on Friday, officers at area county sheriff's offices and state police districts said. They reported a few scattered accidents mostly cars in ditches but few injuries on Friday.

Several people went to Twin City hospital emergency departments on Thursday and Friday, but nearly all the injuries or illnesses were minor.

At BroMenn Regional Medical Center in Normal, emergency department staff treated people injured in 14 motor vehicle crashes, spokesman Eric Alvin said. All the patients were treated and released.

Emergency department staff also treated three patients who fell in the snow. Two suffered fractures and were admitted to the hospital, Alvin said. The third patient had a sprain and was treated and released.

Another patient was being treated in the emergency department Friday for chest pain experienced while shoveling snow.

At OSF St. Joseph Medical Center in Bloomington, emergency department staff treated three people injured in falls and two people injured in motor vehicle accidents. All the injuries were minor, and all the patients were treated and released, spokeswoman Angela Kasel said.

Meanwhile, it was business as usual Friday at Convenient Care an urgent-care clinic and at the primary-care practices of Carle Clinic in Bloomington, director of operations Jim Quinn said.

"Fortunately, we have no weather-related illness or injury to report," Quinn said. "Overall, we're a little bit slower than usual for a Friday. Maybe people aren't out and about as much with the weather being challenging."

Neither of the other urgent-care clinics — BroMenn's HealthPoint and OSF's PromptCare — had seen much weather-related activity either.

"It's not uncommon for HealthPoint to be slower than usual on a heavy snow day because people who are injured go straight to the emergency department," Alvin said.

Central Illinois may get hit with light snowfalls Saturday and Sunday, according to Patrick Bak, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Lincoln.

Bak said there's a 40 percent chance that systems heading from the northwest could dump on the Twin Cities, but the snowfall won't be nearly as heavy as Thursday's storm.

Night City Editor Roger Miller contributed to this story.

BYLINE1:By Paul Swiech

and Brett Nauman

BYLINE2:pswiech@pantagraph.combnauman@pantagraph.com

BLOOMINGTON — The sky was sunny Friday, but the effects of Thursday's snowfall the first big accumulation of the season were still felt on area roads and in classrooms and emergency rooms.

The heavy snowfall Thursday afternoon and evening left 4 to 5 inches covering the Twin Cities and Lincoln, while Pontiac received 6 inches. More snow is possible this weekend.

While schools in Bloomington-Normal were open Friday, several rural districts, including Downs-based Tri-Valley, Delavan and Stanford-based Olympia, closed for the day because of drifting snow.

Conditions on rural roads ranged from clear to icy and hazardous across Central Illinois on Friday, officers at area county sheriff's offices and state police districts said. They reported a few scattered accidents mostly cars in ditches but few injuries on Friday.

Several people went to Twin City hospital emergency departments on Thursday and Friday, but nearly all the injuries or illnesses were minor.

At BroMenn Regional Medical Center in Normal, emergency department staff treated people injured in 14 motor vehicle crashes, spokesman Eric Alvin said. All the patients were treated and released.

Emergency department staff also treated three patients who fell in the snow. Two suffered fractures and were admitted to the hospital, Alvin said. The third patient had a sprain and was treated and released.

Another patient was being treated in the emergency department Friday for chest pain experienced while shoveling snow.

At OSF St. Joseph Medical Center in Bloomington, emergency department staff treated three people injured in falls and two people injured in motor vehicle accidents. All the injuries were minor, and all the patients were treated and released, spokeswoman Angela Kasel said.

Meanwhile, it was business as usual Friday at Convenient Care an urgent-care clinic and at the primary-care practices of Carle Clinic in Bloomington, director of operations Jim Quinn said.

"Fortunately, we have no weather-related illness or injury to report," Quinn said. "Overall, we're a little bit slower than usual for a Friday. Maybe people aren't out and about as much with the weather being challenging."

Neither of the other urgent-care clinics — BroMenn's HealthPoint and OSF's PromptCare — had seen much weather-related activity either.

"It's not uncommon for HealthPoint to be slower than usual on a heavy snow day because people who are injured go straight to the emergency department," Alvin said.

Central Illinois may get hit with light snowfalls Saturday and Sunday, according to Patrick Bak, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Lincoln.

Bak said there's a 40 percent chance that systems heading from the northwest could dump on the Twin Cities, but the snowfall won't be nearly as heavy as Thursday's storm.

Night City Editor Roger Miller contributed to this story.

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