Subscribe for 33¢ / day

BLOOMINGTON — A judge ruled Thursday that a woman convicted of battery is not required to register as a sex offender but she must follow other rules of sex offender probation.

Defense lawyer Stephanie Wong argued that Trina Hall’s conviction for battery of two minor boys does not qualify as a sex offense under state law.

Among the requirements Hall must follow are possible electronic monitoring of her whereabouts and documentation of her phone calls if probation officers make such requests, said Wong.

A McLean County jury acquitted Hall of aggravated criminal sexual abuse but convicted her of battery.

In his Nov. 12 sentencing order, Judge Charles Reynard said Hall must register as a sex offender. He temporarily rescinded the order in December after Hall reported police in Peoria and Bloomington declined to register her as a sex offender because they said the battery conviction did not qualify for registration.

In his ruling Thursday, Reynard stuck with his earlier opinion that the battery was a sexually motivated offense based on the testimony of the minors. He said he believes a sex offender evaluation and recommended treatment is appropriate for Hall.

Reynard also acknowledged that Hall’s case is unique and that she is “certainly not a stereotypical sexual predator.”

Assistant State’s Attorney Bill Workman supported the judge’s ruling that Hall’s offense was related to a sexual intent.

Wong said Hall intends to appeal the ruling.

0
0
0
0
0

Load comments