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I found the article in the Friday, Jan. 27, issue to be most interesting, (“A call to action,” Page A1)!

The roller skating at State Farm had ended not long before I came along in April 1946. But the ex-skaters still were around, and most of them made it clear that they preferred their prior job to their present one!

Perhaps about 1953, Singer Manufacturing Company ran a full page advertisement in an insurance trade magazine about the use of their sewing machines by State Farm Mutual. That resulted in a flood of letters to the State Farm home office. I happened to be the one who answered those inquiries. I remember we invited all of these people to come and check the "hands on" operation; some did. We used a heavy-duty, industrial-type machine. A good operator was one who did not stop the machine between files, but kept a long string sewn close together spewing out of the machine. An "assistant" with a pair of shears cut them apart.

Incidentally the construction of the 13-story home office building was slightly different than The Pantagraph article stated - "built 1929…added to the back in 1939." There were two additions to the original building. The first one went halfway up. The second one, completed in 1946, went the rest of the way up. And that one-step mismatch was only on the first floor. On all of the other floors there was a barely discernable problem where the floor tile joined.

There is a good view of the Bloomington-Normal area from the roof of the building. It shows that this area lies in a slight bowl, with the drainage to the southwest. When "touring" with visitors, I made that roof one of our stops.

Eugene L. Osman

Normal

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