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BLOOMINGTON - About 200 electric customers lost power for a few hours Wednesday morning after a slow-moving storm coated utility lines with ice but caused few other problems for motorists.

About 1 inch of snow fell in the Twin Cities, with most of Central Illinois recording between 1 and 2 inches. Lincoln received about 1.5 inches and Springfield received about 3.5 inches, the National Weather Service said.

The Twin Cities already have received about 8 inches of snow this month, three inches more than average for December, said Mike Hardiman, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Lincoln.

McLean County receives, on average, about 5 inches of snow in December, Hardiman said.

Hardiman said Wednesday's snow hit Lincoln after 2 a.m. and ended around 9 a.m. in Bloomington. A light drizzle lasted through the day in Bloomington-Normal.

The Twin Cities have a slight chance of snow showers through Saturday, but weather service officials don't expect major accumulation, Hardiman said.

The temperature reached a high of about 35 degrees Wednesday, and Hardiman said the temperature could drop through the end of the week. The National Weather Service is forecasting a similar high today, with highs of about 28 degrees Friday and Saturday.

Larry Young, manager of operations for Corn Belt Energy Corp., said his company had a few outages Wednesday morning, with one that lasted a few hours and affected about 200 customers east and northeast of Normal.

He said lines covered with ice began moving up and down because of wind, affecting customers east of Towanda Barnes Road and between Illinois Route 9 and Towanda. Service was restored by 11 a.m.

Police officials in Bloomington, Normal and McLean County said their departments did not have unusually high numbers of traffic accidents because of snow and ice. An Illinois State Police master sergeant said his department handled eight crashes Wednesday morning - which was slightly high - but none was serious.

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